Fitness Challenges for a Deaf Individual

One of the biggest challenges for me in getting fit and staying fit was keeping interested. That, and being able to follow a program or instructor. I’m not one to go jogging alone (scares the crap out of me safety-wise). Plus walks and jogging bore me. I love soccer, so I play and coach as much as I can. But what do I do in the winter or when it’s raining? Plus I like variety in activity but I’ve gotta LOVE it too. I need to be HOOKED to stick with something.

I’ve never been able to follow classes because even being up front, the music and the bouncing movement of the instructor makes lip reading and hearing the commands impossible.

I’ve tried the yoga and Pilates DVDs and classes. I love both, but then the issue becomes being able to see and understand the instructor while doing downward dog. Craning your neck and looking up is difficult plus it defeats the whole purpose of downward dog or warrior pose. So of course I bagged that route, which really isn’t good for my mental health as yoga is good for that.

Then I watched a friend go through two pregnancies while doing Les Mills Pump, and become a certified instructor in it. She is petite like me and at times also had weight issues. Now, after four babies she has a body I’d kill for. Her trick: Shakeology and Les Mills Pump program. She believes in it so strongly that her pictures, and enthusiasm for it got my attention.

I ordered Les Mills Pump and Combat and quickly became HOOKED on Pump. (Combat I just received and haven’t started yet). Then I joined Beachbody under her to be a coach. Of course, I wish to gain income from this, but I believe in the program (unfortunately Beachbody will not be carrying these products So while supplies last, they are on sale) so I decided to become a coach.

As a deaf person I really need to be able to understand and follow instructions and this program allows me to do that. I’m so happy and excited that I have something that I look forward to doing.

When you rely on lip reading or signing, it really makes it hard to find things that you enjoy and can stick with to have an active lifestyle and a healthy one without having to do things on your own.

So if you’re reading this and feeling as frustrated as I was in finding an exercise program, this is it. I promise!

My Facebook post today:
I am so excited to resume my Les Mills Pump today. Migraine is FINALLY gone. A week not doing this was chafing me and i have missed it. That’s pretty cool to me. I’m still starting a challenge group starting next week why not go to http://www.teambeachbody.com/DeafChica and check out the fitness programs and Shakeology and ultimate reset programs? Join me in revolutionizing our lives for the better. Resolutions are for pansies, REVOLUTION is where it’s at!

Connect to me through my contact link on the right and I will add you to my Facebook and challenge group.

Deaf for a Day Challenge

John Barrowman, a British Actor known for his role as the dashing Captain Jack on Dr. Who, went deaf for a day. Here is a link to his blog, and video clip. click here

I love that he did this to raise awareness for the hearing dogs in Britain. He succinctly and accurately describes the effects of a sudden hearing loss. His fatigue, the efforts to communicate, anxiety over his surroundings are all what we experience daily.

I wish more people would try this experiment for a day, or even better, a week. Particularly family and friends who don’t always understand the difficulties I experience daily. Even with the aid of my hearing aid, and cochlear implant processor (which does make things easier), it is still exhausting.

Going deaf for a day is a drop in the bucket of what deaf people live with and experience daily. Let’s create a full bucket of those experiences.

My challenge to my readers:

If you’re a hearing person reading this, I want to challenge you to go deaf for a day, and email me here your experience. I may even add it to my book that I am writing. Write anything and everything that comes to mind about your experience.

Go to a hearing Center, and explain what you plan to do, and have them create a sound blocking mold for you. Go about your life as you normal do and record all your thoughts and experiences for the day. If you’re brave enough, try going for a week. I’d love to see what experiences you have, and will share with my readers your experiences.

Those of you who are deaf, see if your friends and family will participate, so that they may gain an insight into your lives.

Good luck!